Soil

The soils of the hills are derived from gneissic complex parent materials; they are dark brown to dark reddish-brown in colour, varying in depth from 50-200 cm. The texture of soils varies from loamy to fine loamy. The soils of the alluvial plains adjacent to the northwest and southern plateau are very deep, dark brown to reddish-brown in colour and sandy-loam to silty-clay in texture.

Meghalaya soils are rich in organic carbon, which is a measure of nitrogen supplying potential of the soil, deficient in available phosphorous and medium to low in available potassium. The reaction of the soils varies from acidic (pH 5.0 to 6.0) to strongly acidic (pH 4.5 to 5.0). Most of the soils occurring on higher altitudes under high rainfall belt are strongly acidic due to intense leaching. Base saturation of these soils is less than 35 %. These soils are not suitable for intensive crop production.

There is not much difference in fertility classes of the soils of the State. Four soils fertility classes, namely, High Low Medium (HLM), High Medium Medium (HMM), Medium Medium Low (MML), Medium Low Medium (MLM) have been established from the soil test data so far compiled in the Soil Testing Laboratory of the State.

Regarding micronutrient status, it has been observed that almost all the acid soils of the North-Eastern region of the country are deficient in available Boron (B) and Molybdenum (Mo). Acid soils of Meghalaya are rated low in available B and Mo. Total Zinc, Copper and Manganese contents of these soils vary from 10.00 to 17.25, 17.00 to 71.00 and 110 to 770 ppm (parts per million), respectively and DIPA (Diethylene Triamine Penta Acetic Acid) extractable zinc, copper and manganese contents of these soils ranges from 0.72 to 3.20,n 0.6 to 2.8 and 3.0 to 162.0 ppm respectively. A study conducted by the Indian council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) Complex, Shillong revealed that about 40% of the soils of the state contain micronutrients below the critical level.

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